Over Weight - Weight Loss Mechanism
Recent epidemiological and clinical research on human adipocytes now tells us that intakes of high-Calcium may reduce Calcium concentrations in fat cells by lowering the production of two hormones Parathyroid Hormone (PTH) and a hormonal, active form of Vitamin D. This in turn, allows break down and release of fat and suppresses the formation of new fat.

Readily water soluble calcium salts are easily absorbable like the Calcium as in TOTALLY CALCIUM® plays an important role in preventing obesity, by controlling or rather lowering energy metabolism. You need not worry at all, if you have over-eaten a high-calorie diet, Calcium in TOTALLY CALCIUM® is there to regulate your weight gain even during this period.

An important fact on the role of Calcium against our body weight may be considered in this connection

Studies from observations indicate that there is an inverse relationship between our body weight and the combined intakes of dietary Calcium and normal protein.

Observations from a randomized, crossover study of 3 isocaloric 1-week diet reveal the following

Low Calcium and Normal Protein LC/NP 500 mg. Calcium 15% of energy from protein
High Calcium and Normal Protein HC/NP 1800 mg. Calcium 15% of energy from protein
High Calcium and High Protein HC/HP 1800 mg. Calcium 23% of energy from protein

An interesting result emerged from this observational study of HC / NP diet.The fecal fat excretion increased by ~ 2.5 fold.

HC/NP 14.2 g. / day
LC/NP 6.0 g. / day
HC / HP 5.9 g. / day

Not only this, in case of HC / NP diet, the fecal energy excretion increased by ~ 86.6 Kcal / day, compared with LC/NP and HC / HP diets.

These observational studies henceforth explain why a combined intake of dietary Calcium and normal protein may oppose the accretion of excess body weight.

Sources :

1 Office of Dietary Supplements, NIH Clinical Centre, National Institutes of Health
http://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/calcium.asp

2 Regulations of Adiposity and Obesity Risk by Dietary Calcium: Mechanism and Implications, Michael B. Zemel, Ph.D., The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee.

3 Effect of short term high calcium intake on 24 h energy expenditure, fat oxidation and fecal fat excretion, International Journal of Obesity (2005)29, 292 301.

 
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